Mark Southerland/Mariah Harnish

Date: 
Friday, July 5, 2013 - 6:00pm to Saturday, July 20, 2013 - 9:00pm

First Friday Opening - July 5, 6-9pm No More Nomads An Exhibition of Horn Sculptures by Kansas City Artist, Mark Southerland

 

 

AND THEN AT 9PM ON FIRST FRIDAY, JULY 5TH:

Mark Southerland & Annie Ellicott and Brian Haas and Friends will do a killer

NO MORE NOMADS  concert.  $10. ( $7. Members)

 Artist Statement

I construct bodies of work based on cult behavior and sound driven sculptures. The shows are abstracted revivals and pink camouflaged passion plays. My audio tribes perform soft rituals and navigate neon backdrops, petting zoo animals, and international jazz and flamenco musicians. I set up layered happenings that are heavily documented.

I am interested in the big box materials, colors, and images used to promote nature and sport. I shop for the layers of my stage in surplus military stores, online spandex wholesalers, dated disco light renters, and discounted sport shops. I seek costumes, walls, tents, musical instruments, and shelter for my performers.

Feather hoodies and painted backdrops, tiny horns and LEDs inform my dioramas of sound and stories. Vividly costumed performers interact with fantastical backdrops and temporary shelters. These operatic installations pit wearable horn sculptures and cult couture garments against eye candy culture and shanty architecture.

Modern hunting and camping is a mess of urban improvisation and commercial appropriation. Documenting survival scenes into spontaneous tradition with rich storytelling and sound is my ultimate and primary goal.

About

Mark Southerland has used the saxophone as a medium for exploring sound and performance for over 25 years. By reinterpreting the assumed stage presence of a jazz musician, Southerland’s work has run the gamut of pop culture and Rahsaan Roland Kirk tributaries, to wearable horn sculptures and nomadic tent installations. His reinvention of brass and woodwind instruments, circuit-bent electronic children’s toys, and eight track “scratching” turn his stage work into an Alexander Caulder-esque circus of visual and sound possibilities. His “bastardized” horns and costumes have been displayed as free-standing sculptures at the Dolphin Gallery and Urban Culture Projects in Kansas City, the OSP in Boston, and Bridge Art Fair at Art Basel Miami.

A Kansas City native, Mark Southerland has played locally, nationally, and throughout Europe for over ten years. His ongoing projects, Snuff Jazz and Wee Snuff involve a constantly changing cast of musicicians and performers. Southerland recently finished residencies in both New Orleans and New York, performing with a range of international musicians - Helen Gillet, Allison Miller, James Singleton, Skerik and Simon Berz. He appears regularly with the award winning Owen Cox Dance Ensemble and has produced 2 major performance installation pieces with Jane Gotch. He is a natural host and collaborator with other musicians and artists - Brian Haas, Eugene Chadbourne, Todd Sickafoose, Beau Bledsoe, David Ford, Peregrine Honig, and Nick Cave. Southerland continuously extends his possibilities, pushing the improvisatory envelope of visual and auditory standards.

 

  

No More Nomads serves as an homage to the heights of nomadic culture and it’s new found
digital decline. Mark Southerland’s most recent offering in the Noise Camp series once again
pushes the boundaries of hybrid art. No More Nomads dramatically combines Flamenco,
sculptural installation, experimental music and movement, and live video remediation. It is a
unique marriage of tradition and innovation, bringing balance to Southerland’s brand of
maximalism.


No More Nomads is highly collaborative, conceived with several key artists and performers in
mind. Hadley Anne Johnson, recent graduate Parsons Paris, designed and fabricated the
expanding dress center-piece along with other garments. Peregrine Honig, recent OMI Fellow,
advises on concept, story arc, and all visual elements. Laura Frank, student of Roberta Carreri,
Odin Theatre Denmark, directed all a-traditional movement. Zhanna Saparova choreographs
and performs all traditional dance. Matt Tady contributes both as performer and installation
artist. The strength of this piece is it’s cross-disciplinary innovation and the exceptional artists
Southerland has assembled to create it.


No More Nomads will mark a conceptual turning point for performance artist and musician
Mark Southerland, from the surreal to the fantastic. By telling stories with an epiphany that
have cultural and moral relevance, he aims to present this work to a larger audience, thereby
expanding his community.

Concept
Nomadic and impoverished societies are credited with being the “taste makers” and originators of
cultural ideas, movements, and images. With the recent rise in nationalism, many nomadic
cultures have been forced to live in brick and mortar residencies. The technologies that bind them
to a country also allow us to travel the world in an “e-madic” way. However, new media and
digital remediation will never replace the power of physically traveling. No More Nomads will
serve to honor these great nomadic cultures.


A dancer is perched atop a freshly carved pulpit. The long train of her flamenco dress stretches
out some 10 yards, becoming the skin of a shanty tent village. Every motion she makes shifts and
tips the extended structure of her dress. The rhythms of her feet and curling of her hands are
captured on live feed video and projected onto the walls and fabric. A host of movers and
musicians are propping up the tent and living in her shifting train, creating a bizarre and
beautiful soundtrack.


No More Nomads is a contemporary passion play. It explores the stories we have already lost in
the digital age, and the stories we think we know because we have already read them online.
Mark Southerland has used the saxophone as a medium for exploring sound and performance
for over 30 years. By reinterpreting the assumed stage presence of a jazz musician, Southerland’s
work has run the gamut, from experimental pop music and Rahsaan Roland Kirk tributaries, to
wearable horn sculptures and nomadic tent installations. His reinvention of woodwind
instruments, circuit-bent electronic toys, and eight track “scratching” turn his stage work into an
Alexander Calder-esque circus of visual and sound possibilities. His “bastardized” horns and
costumes have been displayed as free-standing sculptures at the Dolphin Gallery, the OSP in
Boston, and Art Basel Miami.


A Kansas City native, Mark Southerland has played locally, nationally, and throughout Europe
for over 15 years. Southerland recently finished residencies in both New Orleans and New York,
performing with a range of international musicians – Helen Gillet, Allison Miller, James
Singleton, Skerik and Simon Berz. He appears regularly with the award winning Owen Cox
Dance Ensemble and has produced several major performance installation pieces with
collaborators like Jane Gotch, Brian Haas, David Ford, Beau Bledsoe, and Peregrine Honig.
Southerland continuously extends his possibilities, pushing the improvisatory envelope of visual
and auditory standards.


Hadley Anne Johnson is a garment designer and fabricator who is a recent graduate of Parsons
Paris. She was named designer of the year for the class of 2010. Hadley shows her collections
internationally, and was a contributor to the Kansas City installation based performances of WE!
and See Saw.


Peregrine Honig is an artist, designer and artistic director, whose work is included in the
collections of the Fogg Art Museum, the Whitney Museum, Yale Museum of Art and the
Albright-Knox Art Gallery. She is also a recent Art Omi graduate, and she has contributed to
previous productions including See Saw and Simple Myth.


Laura Frank is a director of movement and a performer who studied at Odin Theater in
Denmark under Roberta Carreri, and has performed at the DAH Theatre of Belgrade, and NaCl
Theatre of New York. She has previously participated in WE! and Moonbears and Sister Wives.
.Zhanna Saparova is a Flamenco performer and choreographer. She performs regularly with Al
Andaluz, and both studies and performs Flamenco internationally.


Matt Tady is an Installation artist and performer. He runs Level Projects – an artisan leather and
woodcraft company, and performs regionally with the Cosmic Tady Brothers. Past collaborations
include WE!, See Saw, & Moon Bears and Sister Wives

And:

 Cairo Spring An Exhibition of Photography by Tulsa Artist, Mariah Harnish

 

Photography. In its essence it is a means of capturing the light, of shedding light, of illumination. My goal when shooting is to sift reality with the opening of the shutter, the gaping eye of the lens, and distill down that which I have captured into an essential quality. There are many things I see that strike me, that I would like to capture, but when the need to document something in its most present form, its essence, is so dire that if I were to hesitate it would cease in its reality, it is then that I shoot. My current installation, Cairo Spring, is a reflection of the culture and individuals who spawned one of the most powerful civic revolutions in recent years. Encountering the spirit of change in all the places besides the face of a newspaper it is found: in the market buying dinner, in the dirt coating the feet of those who will take the first steps toward a new day, in the alien form of foreign commercialization, it is an awareness of the unknown in all its formless possibilities that these works hope to inspire.

 

Both Exhibits continue through July 20, 2013.  Gallery hours are:  T, W, F, & S 1-5pm, Th 1-9pm, Closed Sun & M