WELCOME TO MAD DOG, TX - EXHIBIT

Date: 
Friday, September 5, 2014 (All day) to Thursday, September 25, 2014 (All day)

 Myers Gallery, Hours: T, W,F,S: 1-5p; Th: 1-9p. Closed Sun & Mon

 

 

"This exhibition is part of an ongoing project of transitioning physical objects, events, and social interactions from my dreaming awareness of Mad Dog into the real world."

-John Bryant

 

"Welcome to Mad Dog, Texas!"

In September, Living Arts will host "Welcome to Mad Dog, Texas," a community outreach and art exhibition made possible by the Mad Dog County Sheriff's Department, Swaggins' Ministries, and the TransGlobal Alliance.

In an attempt to bridge the cultural gap between the artistic community and Red Blooded Texans and Americans, Swaggins Ministries and the Sheriff's Department are proud to present this one of a kind exhibition of occult and degenerate art. The works on display are drawn from a number of decades and genres, from traditional printmaking and works on paper, to obscure folk or outsider art, and from the street to the darkest corners of the deep web.

While we believe that forewarned is forearmed, this exhibition should only be viewed Red Blooded Patriots who are firm and steadfast in their convictions.

As a part of the exhibition, a practical workshop on esoteric surveillance and street photography will be held September XX. In this workshop, participants will grab a camera and hit the streets, developing or refining their street photography skills as they document a dérive, or unplanned drift, through downtown Tulsa in the pursuit of occult insights into the fabric of the city and its inhabitants.

Remember the motto of our Mad Dog: "Welcome to Mad Dog! Now watch your step!"

 

 

Tulsa artist John Bryant brings his invented world of Mad Dog, Texas to Living Arts for this September-run show in the West End Gallery. Bryant, fresh off a show at TAC, created “Welcome to Mad Dog, Texas” for his MFA thesis show at the University of Tulsa. Mad Dog is an imagined sister-city to Tulsa. In the exhibit of collages and other objects, Bryant creates a fictional outreach event sponsored by Mad Dog community groups, such as Swaggins Ministries and the Mad Dog County Sheriff's Department.

“The style of the presentation mimics a small-town museum or community center, with panels of expository wall text, faux evidence, and mislabeled art, which gallery visitors can explore,” Bryant says.

Visitors to the show will have the opportunity to take part of the exhibition home in the form of souvenir T-shirts, tarot cards, and pamphlets. For those attending during First Friday, Bryant will live screen T-shirts.

The art objects are part of a process of instantiating the fictional world of Mad Dog, blurring the line between the real and the fake, in an attempt to vandalize reality through the deliberate insertion of the fictional into the everyday. Bryant intends for visitors to be unsure about what is true and what isn't, leading visitors into the wilderness of mirrors.

“The tangled web created by theses (fictional) organizations is intended to provoke visitors causing them to consider the ways in which real organizations shape contemporary culture,” Bryant says. “Conspiracies, real or imagined, haunt the American mental landscape. “This work needs an audience willing to engage with the work, an audience prepared for work that challenges and provokes. Living Arts has built that kind of audience.”

Influenced as much by literature as visual art, Bryant's work draws on the the weird fiction of H.P. Lovecraft and Robert W. Chambers, the later novels of William S. Burroughs, Robert Anton Wilson and Robert Shea's Illuminatus! trilogy and William Gibson's Blue Ant trilogy. Bryant's work is an attempt to bring together these disparate influence, blending collage and pastiche to create a body of work that bridges the gap between visual art and fiction.

 

 

Esoteric Surveillance - A Practical Workshop
September 23, 6-8pm
The Sheriff's Department of Mad Dog, Texas is proud to present a
practical guide to Esoteric Surveillance. In this workshop, participants
will grab a camera and hit the streets, developing or refining their
street photography skills as they document a dérive, or unplanned drift,
through downtown Tulsa in the pursuit of occult insights into the fabric
of the city and its inhabitants.

You should bring:
    •    A camera, along with whatever film, digital storage media,
lenses, bag, or other gear you will need to operate on the street. Pack
light, but be prepared! Don't forget batteries, charging cables, and
extra film or storage media.
    •    Comfortable clothes and shoes for urban exploration.
    •    A bottle of water, sunblock, a big hat, or whatever else
you'll need to be comfortable outside.

You should be prepared to:
    •    Take photos on the street.
    •    Remain outdoors shooting photos for at least two hours.
    •    Cooperate and collaborate.